Message from the President and Scientific Director

Dr. Tom Mikkelsen, President and Scientific Director of the Ontario Brain Institute (OBI), reviews the accomplishments and innovations of OBI over the past 5 years, and how this lays the foundation for even greater impacts in brain research, commercialization and care in our next phase.

Connecting Research Back to the Community

Ontario Brain Institute (OBI) believes connecting its research programs with patients and their advocates is critical to having relevant and high impact programs.

OBI has worked with each of its Integrated Discovery Programs (ID) to form five separate Patient Advisory Committees (PACs) that consist of advisors from various neurological health charities (e.g., Alzheimer Society of Ontario or Autism Ontario), researchers, caregivers, and patients. The purpose of these committees is to bring the patient voice to our ID Programs, promote knowledge exchange between patients, advocates, caregivers and researchers, discuss key issues for patients, and connect the research back to their communities faster. Continue reading “Connecting Research Back to the Community”

Brain-CODE – An Engine for Collaboration

The Ontario Brain Institute (OBI)  builds collaborations between Ontario neuroscientists so that they can combine their diverse expertise and resources to better understand brain disorders and translate these discoveries into new tools and treatments. Continue reading “Brain-CODE – An Engine for Collaboration”

Brain-CODE Offers First Open Data Access

Ontario has one of the highest concentrations of brain researchers anywhere in the world. But researchers in this community largely worked in isolation and tended not to share ideas or data. The Ontario Brain Institute’s (OBI’s) Integrated Discovery Programs changed this and brought large groups of researchers together to better understand and treat brain disorders. This collaborative approach led to the idea of standardizing data and housing it in a shared space where it is curated, analyzed and shared. This ensures that the data are collected in the same manner, making it easier to share and accelerate discovery. Continue reading “Brain-CODE Offers First Open Data Access”

Grooming Entrepreneurial Talent for Great Health Returns

Ontario has one of the highest concentrations of neuroscientists in the world, creating an opportunity for a thriving industry around the development of neurotechnologies to treat brain disorders. However, a study of Ontario’s ability to develop a neurotechnology cluster highlighted two obstacles; a lack of access to capital and insufficient managerial talent. Continue reading “Grooming Entrepreneurial Talent for Great Health Returns”

Growing Entrepreneurial Talent across Ontario

Mark began to notice that tremors were significantly impacting his grandmother’s quality of life. She was struggling with routine tasks, like pouring coffee without spilling. Mark’s concern for his grandmother motivated him to find a solution for her tremors. Applying concepts he learned as a civil engineering student, he began creating a lightweight glove that adaptively stabilizes the wrist to reduce the impact of tremors. This was how Steadiwear came into being. Continue reading “Growing Entrepreneurial Talent across Ontario”

Building Networks Fundamental to Improving Health Impacts

Since the inception of Ontario Brain Institute (OBI) in 2010, we have been forging ahead with a singular mission – improve the lives of the over one million Ontarians living with a brain disorder.

OBI’s work focuses on three key areas: engaging patients in research; catalyzing evidence into practice and promoting a culture of evaluation. Through these efforts we are working alongside with communities and organizations to achieve a greater health impact than we could drive independently. Impact stories from each of the three areas help understand the rationale behind our approach and the results it has achieved thus far. Continue reading “Building Networks Fundamental to Improving Health Impacts”