A Holistic Way to Think About Our Health and Reframe Disability

No one likes to be defined by an illness, disorder or disability – even when we are a patient. Our ‘health’ is not only based on our biology, but also by our relationships with friends and family and our ability to do the things we enjoy. Researchers Drs. Peter Rosenbaum and Jan-Willem Gorter from our cerebral palsy research program (CP-NET) wrote a concept paper[1] explaining how holistic thinking towards health can create a better framework to approach childhood disability. This framework helps to identify the ability and potential in persons with disabilities like cerebral palsy so people can work with them the same way we should with anyone else.

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International Self Care Day – 5 Tips for Maximizing Brain Health

Keeping our brains healthy is a great way to take care of ourselves; fortunately, what’s good for our bodies is also good for our brains.

The Ontario Brain Institute’s President and Scientific Director, Dr. Tom Mikkelsen, shares 5 tips to help you take charge of your brain health.

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Message From Dr. Tom Mikkelsen, President And Scientific Director Of OBI

At the risk of stating the obvious, the brain is complex and brain disorders represent a large and growing concern for global health. It’s likely that we all agree on the scale and importance of this problem, but like all big problems, there are many different approaches to reach a solution. Continue reading “Message From Dr. Tom Mikkelsen, President And Scientific Director Of OBI”

Message From Dr. Tom Mikkelsen, President And Scientific Director Of OBI

Your brain is always changing. It is constantly processing information from your body and making sense of the world around you. And in doing so, your brain itself is changing. In fact it continues changing throughout your lifetime. You experience this change with every new skill you learn, and every old memory you forget. Neurogenesis, or the creation of new brain cells, is a primary driver of this change: cells are born then differentiate into a specific type of neuron, migrate to their destination in the brain, and then finally integrate into a new or existing network. As the new President and Scientific Director of the Ontario Brain Institute, I feel this is a fitting way to introduce myself to all of you. Continue reading “Message From Dr. Tom Mikkelsen, President And Scientific Director Of OBI”