Meet Ontario’s Brain Power Day at Queen’s Park

The Ontario Brain Institute (OBI) held “Meet Ontario’s Brain Power” at Queen’s Park on Monday, September 11, 2017. The event highlighted OBI’s work across the province that has positioned Ontario as a world leader in brain research, commercialization and care. More than 60 researchers, companies and patient representatives demonstrated community and economic impacts. Below are a few photos from the day. Continue reading “Meet Ontario’s Brain Power Day at Queen’s Park”

Searching for signs of depression and suicide

By Shaalee Sone, Outreach Intern, Ontario Brain Institute

Individuals who have attempted suicide often say that if one person had taken a minute to ask them how they were feeling it could have prevented them from engaging in suicidal behaviour. While it’s healthy to regularly discuss feelings with loved ones, and we want to support those in need, how can we tell when someone is contemplating suicide and if we should talk about it with them? Beyond individual help, it can also be challenging to find systemic help. A recent ICES report found that mental health and addictions care for youth is poor in five provinces, including Ontario.

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Reducing the stigma of overdose and increasing awareness

By: Shaalee Sone, Outreach Intern, Ontario Brain Institute

There is a tendency to categorize people who have died or been injured by overdose as “others,” but overdose can affect anyone – our friends, our parents, our siblings, our children and even ourselves. The impact of overdose extends beyond each individual, onto their family, their friends and the people who care about them which is why we need to address the stigma around overdose collectively.

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Another side of cerebral palsy: the genetic story

Photo credit: Veronica Rousseau

By: Shaalee Sone, Outreach Intern, Ontario Brain Institute

In the age of genomics we are racing to uncover what our genes say about us. If we had the ability to read our genetic code and learn what’s in store, we could play to our strengths and prepare for our limitations.

One obstacle to deciphering the information in our genes is knowing what patterns to look for in specific genes. For some disorders, like Huntington’s disease, clinicians know exactly what gene to look at and how to read the signs. Other diseases, like cancer, are too diverse to find a single gene pattern; instead, we subdivide cancer into sets and look for gene patterns in each set.

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5 Tips for Maximizing Brain Health

Keeping our brains healthy is a great way to take care of ourselves; fortunately, what’s good for our bodies is also good for our brains.

The Ontario Brain Institute’s President and Scientific Director, Dr. Tom Mikkelsen, shares 5 tips to help you take charge of your brain health.

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OBI’s Founding President and Scientific Director Named Officer of the Order of Canada

A message from Dr. Tom Mikkelsen, President and Scientific Director

The Order of Canada is one of Canada’s highest civilian honours. It recognizes an individual’s outstanding achievement, dedication to the community, and service to the nation. 2017 marks Canada’s 150th anniversary and the 50th anniversary of this unique award. During this especially notable year, we are thrilled to celebrate the recognition of the Ontario Brain Institute’s (OBI) Founding President and Scientific Director, Dr. Donald Stuss. Continue reading “OBI’s Founding President and Scientific Director Named Officer of the Order of Canada”