Research Updates

OBI’s Integrated Discovery Programs bring together over 200 core researchers and clinicians, 35 institutions, 40 companies, and 20 patient advocacy groups from across Ontario.

Read about their latest news and progress in the updates that they have provided. Continue reading “Research Updates”

Hitting A Bullseye Using Biomarkers

By: Martin Smith, OBI Intern, Outreach

The brain is complicated.  After a century of research we are still making new discoveries every day.  Our knowledge of how this organ works is limited because it is a network of highly-specialized cells and the network is always being rewired. Continue reading “Hitting A Bullseye Using Biomarkers”

Patients’ Priorities: It’s A Very Good Place To Start

By Meredith Bibbings, OBI Intern, Research

The most effective initiatives are responsive to the needs of those who stand to benefit from them. In research, this can mean understanding the patient, policy, commercialization, and care provider landscape. Continue reading “Patients’ Priorities: It’s A Very Good Place To Start”

International Data Linkages For New Possibilities In Autism Research

OBI catalyzes the impact of brain research in Ontario by increasing collaboration among researchers, doctors, patients and their advocates, and industry partners. A key ingredient to collaboration is, of course, sharing.  At OBI, a cornerstone of effective research collaboration involves sharing large quantities of data. In order for this to be done effectively, it must be stored somewhere where it can be accessed and analyzed collectively. Continue reading “International Data Linkages For New Possibilities In Autism Research”

Autism Across the Lifespan

What do you see when you think of autism? Up until recently, I would picture early intervention with children. But what happens once those children grow up? While early intervention and services for children are important, the needs of adults living with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have gone somewhat unnoticed. Children with ASD grow up to be adults with ASD, and continue to have needs that require supports and services.
Continue reading “Autism Across the Lifespan”